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SaskBuilds forges new paths to a brighter Saskatchewan

Sudarshan Sitaula
|Feb 21|magazine5 min read

Building infrastructure does not happen overnight, and the process starts long before foundations are laid. One of the most crucial preliminary steps is the procurement of resources needed to build a proposed bridge or road or facility—and effective cost-conscious procurement can make all the difference in the budget and timeline of a project.

In Saskatchewan, these vital procurement strategies are the responsibility of Treasury Board Crown corporation SaskBuilds. Created by the Saskatchewan government in 2012, SaskBuilds is on a mission to manage and advise the construction of Saskatchewan’s large-scale infrastructure projects.

Through its dedication to its core values, including integrity, transparency and innovation, SaskBuilds is working to ensure that Saskatchewan projects are completed on time and under budget to best serve the province and its population.

“We have committed to being transparent in our actions and our integrity is demonstrated in our accountability to that commitment,” said SaskBuilds President and CEO Rupen Pandya. “Our work is highly innovative in nature. We are committed to improving traditional procurement by applying the lessons we learn through alternative procurement, and by leading a comprehensive long-term capital planning process.”

Entering the field of P3

“Saskatchewan has experienced remarkable growth over the last several years, and with growth comes an increasing demand for new highways, schools, healthcare facilities and more to support an improved quality of life for Saskatchewan people,” said Minister Responsible for SaskBuilds, Hon. Gordon Wyant. Part of SaskBuilds’ mandate to examine the best procurement options has included a thorough look into alternative procurement models, including public-private partnerships (P3).

For more about SaskBuilds projects, growth and P3 partnerships, read the full article in Business Review Canada