#Charity: Water#Environment Canada#U.N.#United Nations#World Water Day#World Water Day Canada#Circle of Blue#Nature Canada#Twitter#the Pacific Institute

World Water Day: 5 Organizations Making a Difference

|Mar 22|magazine12 min read

In honor of World Water Day and the fact that water is my favorite drink—(if you don’t believe me check out my company profile), Business Review Canada is highlighting five North American organizations that protect, conserve, and provide water to communities throughout the world.

1)      Water for People-Canada This is a non-profit international humanitarian organization that builds water projects to provide clean safe water and sanitation solutions to people in developing nations. It is the Canadian sector of the U.S. organization Water for People, which has completed over 50 projects for people in Bolivia, Honduras, Guatemala, Malawi and Vietnam. The organization strives to equip and empower the local communities to protect and sustain their water supply. Water fact: 1 in 8 people in the world don’t have access to clean water.

2)      Charity: Water This is another non-profit organization dedicated to providing clean drinking water and sanitation to people in developing countries but their model has an unusual twist. 100 percent of all donations are put into funding the water projects, not paying for staff, website upkeep or email campaigns. I don’t know how they do it but if their model intrigues you, check out their website on the link above. Charity:Water also has an interesting campaign called “Giving your birthday away” where donors ask for donations to the organization rather than birthday gifts.

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3)      Environment Canada is a government organization whose business is “protecting the environment, conserving the country's natural heritage, and providing weather and meteorological information to keep Canadians informed and safe,” according to their  website. If you are wondering why your government is making certain environmental decisions, then checking out the research and environmental summaries made by Environment Canada will probably enlighten you. If that information stirs you to action, see organization number 5, Nature Canada to find out ways to change public policy and your daily habits to protect natural resources.

4)      Circle of Blue Providing accurate non-biased information to the public is an additional aspect of the water conservation that Circle of Blue addresses through an “international network of leading journalists, scientists and communications design experts that reports and presents the information necessary to respond to the global freshwater crisis.” These experts serve on international water conferences and provide information to government officials and citizens alike. Circle of Blue is a nonprofit independent affiliate of the internationally recognized water, climate and policy think tank, the Pacific Institute.

5)      Nature Canada Everyone has a part to play in the water situation, whether their part is to donate money, build wells, conduct research, or install low-flow faucets and toilets. Nature Canada is a non-profit conservation organization that provides information and advocacy for Canada’s environment and natural resources. Whether you want to promote wind energy, protest the use of tar sands drilling, or consume less water, Nature Canada has the information and tools to empower you.

To find out more information, click on the UN World Water Day page or check out what people are promoting on the World Water Day Twitter page. Also, be sure to check out the May issue of Business Review Canada which will feature Canada’s top charities!